Windows Kernel Exploitation: Stack Overflow

Introduction

This post is on exploiting a stack based buffer overflow in the HackSysExtremeVulnerableDriver.
There’s lot of background theory required to understand types of Windows drivers, developing drivers, debugging drivers, etc. I will only focus on developing the exploit while explaining some internal structures briefly. I would assume you have experience with assembly, C, debugging in the userland.
This driver is a kernel driver. A driver is typically used to get our code into the kernel. An unhandled exception will cause the famous BSOD. I will be using Windows 7 32-bit for this since it doesn’t support SMEP (Supervisor Mode Execution Prevention) or SMAP (Supervisor Mode Access Prevention). In simple words, I would say that when SMEP is enabled the CPU will generate a fault whenever the ring0 tries to execute code from a page marked with the user bit. Basically, due to this being not enabled, we can map our shellcode to steal the ‘System’ token. Check the Shellcode Analysis part for the analysis. Exploiting this vulnerability on a 64-bit system is different.
You can use the OSR Driver Loader to load the driver into the system.
If you want to debug the machine itself using windbg you can use VirtualKD or LiveKD

You can add a new serial connection using VirtualBox or VMware, so you can debug the guest system via windbg. I will be using a serial connection from VMware.
For kernel data structures refer to this. I have used it mostly to refer the structures.
After you have registered the driver you should see this in ‘msinfo32’.

If you check the loaded modules in the ‘System’ process you should see our kernel driver ‘HEVD.sys’.


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